Corrado Cagli and George Balanchine on Stage: An Artistic Collaboration. A conversation with Jennifer Homans and Raffaele Bedarida

 

December 12, 2023, 6:00 PM

General Admission: $15, Members & Students: FREE

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Join us for a conversation on George Balanchine and his collaboration with Corrado Cagli, the subject of CIMA’s current exhibition. In the years after the Second World War, Cagli settled temporarily in New York City, where he engaged with the local cultural milieu. His acquaintance with George Balanchine, the co- founder of the Ballet Society (today’s New York City Ballet), blossomed into an artistic collaboration and into the staging of The Triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne, performed in New York in 1948, for which Cagli designed distinct costumes and the stage set.

An expert on George Balanchine and author of the Pulitzer Prize nominated biography Mr. B: George Balanchine’s 20th Century (2022), Jennifer Homans will examine his activities in those early postwar years, while Raffaele Bedarida will illustrate the complexity of the costumes and of the set designed by Cagli for The Triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne. Together they will delve in the historical and political coordinates behind the project, the role of Lincoln Kirstein, co-founder with Balanchine of the Ballet Society, and the importance of performance art at MoMA.

 

Jennifer Homans is the Dance Critic for The New Yorker. She is the author of Mr. B: George Balanchine’s 20th Century (2022), finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Apollo’s Angels: A History of Ballet (2010), finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and among the NYT 10 Best Books of the Year. Homans was a professional dancer and performed with the Pacific Northwest Ballet before earning a BA at Columbia University and a PhD in Modern European History at New York University, where she is now a Distinguished Scholar in Residence and the Founding Director of the Center for Ballet and the Arts.

 

Raffaele Bedarida is  the curator of CIMA’s current exhibition Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948. He is an art historian and curator specializing in transnational modernism and politics. An associate professor or art history at Cooper Union, he holds a Ph.D. from the CUNY Graduate Center, New York as well as M.A. and B.A. degrees from the Università degli Studi di Siena, Italy. He was the inaugural fellow of CIMA in 2014. Bedarida’s research has focused on cultural diplomacy, migration, and exchange between Italy and the United States. He has also worked on exhibition history, censorship, and propaganda under Fascism and during the Cold War. His most recent books are Exhibiting Italian Art in the US from Futurism to Arte Povera: Like a Giant Screen (London: Routledge, 2022) and Curating Fascism: Exhibitions and Memory from the Fall of Mussolini to Today, co-edited with Sharon Hecker (London: Bloomsbury, 2022). The English translation of his monograph on Cagli’s exile (Rome: Donzelli, 2018) was published by the Centro Primo Levi Editions in concurrence with the CIMA exhibition.

 

Light refreshments will be provided

 

Public programming at CIMA is made possible with the generous support of Tiro a Segno Foundation.

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Art, Memory, Place: Ancient and Contemporary Art in the Synagogues. A conversation with Adachiara Zevi and Ittai Weinryb

 

December 04, 2023, 6:00 PM

General Admission: $15, Members & Students: FREE

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS HERE!

Join us for an engaging exploration of the intersection of art, memory, and place in the context of synagogues throughout history. For centuries, synagogues have served as places of worship but also as focal points for communal and intellectual life. As such, their spaces have attracted the interest and intervention of artists. This conversation will delve into the relationship between synagogues and artistic expression, examining cases from different periods and geographical locations. The dialogue will traverse various artistic projects developed at synagogue sites worldwide, spanning from early historic examples to contemporary, site-specific installations. Professors Zevi and Weinryb will specifically highlight notable projects, including Corrado Cagli’s Memorial on the Square of the Old Synagogue in Göttingen, Germany, and the contemporary art initiative Arte in Memoria—a biennial art exhibition situated at the Synagogue in the archaeological park of Ostia Antica, Italy.

The conversation will highlight how artists have contributed new interpretations and readings of synagogue spaces, how their projects have brought new life into historical sites, and the significance of contemporary installations that offer fresh perspectives on the role of synagogues in the modern world. The event will also offer the opportunity to learn about the volume La Sinagoga di Ostia Antica: 60 anni dalla scoperta, 20 anni di Arte in Memoria, which examines the history of the oldest synagogue in Europe and its relationship with contemporary art.

 

About Adachiara Zevi. Architect, art historian, and professor of Art History, Adachiara Zevi was a Fulbright Scholar from 1987 to 1988 at Columbia University in New York. She has always accompanied her academic activities with a historical and critical commitment to the arts with an uninterrupted attention toward such Italian and international artists as Enrico Castellani, Piero Dorazio, Jannis Kounellis, Dan Graham and Sol LeWitt, for whom she has curated exhibitions, catalogues and monographs.
Among her books: Arte USA del Novecento, Peripezie del dopoguerra nell’arte italiana, L’Italia nei Wall Drawings di Sol LeWitt and Monumenti per difetto.
Prof. Zevi was the curator of the Arte in memoria biennial of contemporary art at the Synagogue in Ostia Antica and the Stolpersteine project in Italy. She is the President of the Bruno Zevi Foundation and the Arte in memoria Association, a member of the CDEC (Center for Contemporary Jewish Documentation) scientific committee and a member of the Fondazione Villa Emma scientific committee. In 2018 she received the honour “Cavalierato dell’Ordine al Merito della Repubblica Federale di Germania”. Since 1987 she is a regular collaborator with the Corriere della Sera daily newspaper, and since 2012 with Pagine Ebraiche, the monthly of the Union of the Italian Jewish Communities.

 

Ittai Weinryb teaches and writes on medieval and early modern art and material and visual culture from the greater Mediterranean to Eurasia and the Indian Ocean. He is currently completing a book on art and material culture circulating in the Black Sea region during the Middle Ages and another monograph which centers on the sentiment of Hope as a category of artistic creativity. He is the co-editor of the book series Art/Work which is set to narrate a new history of art founded in the study of objects, materials, and technology. He is the author of The Bronze Object in the Middle Ages (2016) and of Die Hildesheimer Avantgarde: Kunst und Kolonialismus im mittelalterlichen Deutschland (2023), and the curator of the curator of the exhibition Agents of Faith: Votive Objects in Time and Place (2018).

 

Light refreshments will be provided

 

Public programming at CIMA is made possible with the generous support of Tiro a Segno Foundation.

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Persisting Matters: An Artist Talk Series – Kambui Olujimi in conversation with Rujeko Hockley

 

November 21, 2023, 6:00 PM

General Admission: FREE

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS HERE!

Please join us for the third in a series of encounters and conversations with contemporary artists, this time with Kambui Olujimi and Rujeko Hockley.

Persisting Matters is a series of talks that places contemporary artists in conversation with scholars, curators, critics, and the public. The series is developed in the context of CIMA’s 2023-2024 exhibition, Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948, and supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Cagli saw his artistic practice as a tool for anti-rhetorical resistance and critique to power in times of exile, displacement and trauma. Questions of gender, racism, political oppression and resilience through art and community practices were central to his work in the years of his exile from Italy, due to the country’s racial laws. Persisting Matters engages contemporary artists, whose practices explore these pressing subjects in their individual context and prism.

Kambui Olujimi was born and raised in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. He received his MFA from Columbia University and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. His work challenges established modes of thinking that commonly function as “inevitabilities.” This pursuit takes shape through interdisciplinary bodies of work spanning sculpture, installation, photography, writing, video and performance. His works have premiered nationally and internationally at Sundance Film Festival, Museum of Modern Art, LACMA, Sharjah Biennial 15, 14th Dak’Art Biennale, and Kunsthal Rotterdam, among others. Olujimi has been awarded grants, fellowships and residencies from The Andrew Mellon Foundation, Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Black Rock Senegal, MacDowell, and Yaddo.

Rujeko Hockley is the Arnhold Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She co-curated the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Additional projects at the Whitney include Inheritance (2023), 2 Lizards (2022), Jennifer Packer: The Eye Is Not Satisfied With Seeing (2021), Julie Mehretu (2021), Toyin Ojih Odutola: To Wander Determined (2017) and An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940-2017 (2017). Previously, she was Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum, where she co-curated Crossing Brooklyn: Art from Bushwick, Bed-Stuy, and Beyond (2014) and was involved in exhibitions highlighting the permanent collection as well as artists LaToya Ruby Frazier, Kehinde Wiley, and others. She is the co-curator of We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85 (2017), which originated at the Brooklyn Museum and travelled to three U.S. venues in 2017-18. She serves on the Boards of Art Matters, Institute For Freedoms, and Museums Moving Forward, as well as the Advisory Board of Recess.

This series is developed through a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Light refreshments will be provided.

WATCH THE VIDEO OF THE EVENT

 

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Una Giornata Particolare (A Special Day): A Film Screening at CIMA

 

November 16, 2023, 6:30 PM

General Admission: $15, Members & Students: FREE

In Italian with English subtitles (1 hr and 50 min)

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS HERE!

In conjunction with CIMA’s current exhibition Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938 – 1948, we are hosting an in-person screening of Una Giornata Particolare (A Special Day), a film directed by Ettore Scola, starring Marcello Mastroianni and Sofia Loren. 

In Ettore Scola’s funny, humane ‘A Special Day’, Antonietta and Gabriele are never really a couple, but their brief encounter lights up the screen with the kind of radiance you get only from great movie actors who also are great stars. —Vincent Canby, The New York Times

Synopsis: Released in 1977, this historic film is about May 6th, 1938, the day Adolf Hitler visited Benito Mussolini in Rome for the first time. The film takes place entirely in a working class apartment building where Antonietta (Loren) and Gabriele (Mastroianni) are neighbors. When her husband leaves with their six kids to watch Hitler’s arrival, Antonietta unexpectedly meets Gabriele, the only other person in the apartment complex not attending the parade, and they create an unforeseen friendship. Throughout the film, Antonietta and Gabriele discover things about each other and the world around them that Scola brings to life with perfect detail and context of the start of the fascist regime. 

The film will be introduced by Joseph Perna, visiting assistant professor of modern and contemporary Italian literature at New York University. Perna’s research centers on vernacular modernism in Italy, with a special emphasis on cinema, photography, and magazines in the years surrounding the Second World War. He has published essays on Max Ophuls and Mario Soldati in the Italianist, and has written on early opera for a volume dedicated to innovation in Counter-Reformation Italy. He is currently at work on two book-length projects: a scholarly monograph on melodrama, Passionate Viewing in Modern Italy, and an English translation of Soldati’s interwar autobiography, America Primo Amore. 

 

Public programming at CIMA is made possible with the generous support of Tiro a Segno Foundation.

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Persisting Matters: An Artist Talk Series – Beatrice Scaccia in conversation with Giorgio Di Domenico

 

November 14, 2023, 6:00 PM

General Admission: FREE

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS HERE!

Please join us for the second in a series of encounters and conversations with contemporary artists, this time with Beatrice Scaccia and Giorgio Di Domenico.

Persisting Matters is a series of talks that places contemporary artists in conversation with scholars, curators, critics, and the public. The series is developed in the context of CIMA’s 2023-2024 exhibition, Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948, and supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Cagli saw his artistic practice as a tool for anti-rhetorical resistance and critique to power in times of exile, displacement and trauma. Questions of gender, racism, political oppression and resilience through art and community practices were central to his work in the years of his exile from Italy, due to the country’s racial laws. Persisting Matters engages contemporary artists, whose practices explore these pressing subjects in their individual context and prism.

Bea Scaccia (b.1978, Veroli, Italy) earned her BA and MFA at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome where she studied with the late Italian artist Gino Marotta.  In her paintings, she reworks the elements that collectively give rise to illusions of beauty and constructions of appearance, compressing them on the canvas as surreal, uncanny marks of affectation. Investigating the cultural links between feminine splendor and monstrosity, she builds pictorial compositions that can be read as true parodies of bon ton.

A trained realist painter, Scaccia’s method is more spontaneous rather than it is planned.  She uses recurring visual tropes such as faux fur, jewels, wigs, cloth to signify darker psychological themes pertaining to female beauty. Pearls and hair clips become infestations; what was seen as well-ordered in the sensual hairdos of the Baroque and Rococo periods becomes unavoidably disturbing. The result is an over-the-top composition exemplifying an existential struggle to be contained.

Since 2011 Scaccia has been based in New York City, and has exhibited in various galleries and institutions both locally and worldwide including Katonah Museum of Art, New York, Galleria Ugo Ferranti, Rome, Galleria Nazionale, Rome, Magazzino Italian Art, NY, and the American University’s Katzen Arts Center, Washington, D.C., among others. Her work is found in collections including the William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation and the Portland Museum of Art.

Giorgio Di Domenico is a PhD student in Art History at the Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, and a former research fellow of the Center for Italian Modern Art, New York. His research focuses on the reception of Surrealism in Italy during the 1960s and 1970s. He interned at La Galleria Nazionale in Rome and the Italian Cultural Institute in New York and was a visiting graduate student at New York University Casa Italiana. Giorgio published papers on Jannis Kounellis, Diego Marcon, and Alberto Burri, and he is one of the contributing authors to the forthcoming Robert Rauschenberg catalogue raisonné. He writes regularly on contemporary art in magazines including “Antinomie,” “NERO,” and “Flash Art.”

This series is developed through a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Light refreshments will be provided!

WATCH THE VIDEO OF THE EVENT

 

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Persisting Matters: An Artist Talk Series – Sheila Pepe in conversation with Lex Lancaster

 

November 07, 2023, 6:00 PM

General Admission: FREE

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS HERE!

Join us for the first in a series of encounters and conversations with contemporary artists, starting with Sheila Pepe and Lex Lancaster.

Persisting Matters is a series of talks that places contemporary artists in conversation with scholars, curators, critics, and the public. The series is developed in the context of CIMA’s 2023-2024 exhibition, Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948, and supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Cagli saw his artistic practice as a tool for anti-rhetorical resistance and critique to power in times of exile, displacement and trauma. Questions of gender, racism, political oppression and resilience through art and community practices were central to his work in the years of his exile from Italy, due to the country’s racial laws. Persisting Matters engages contemporary artists, whose practices explore these pressing subjects in their individual context and prism.

About Sheila Pepe:

Sheila Pepe is best known for crocheting her large-scale, ephemeral installations and sculpture made from domestic and industrial materials. However, the exhibition Sheila Pepe: Hot Mess Formalism, curated by Gilbert Vicario for the Phoenix Museum of Art, and the catalog published with it, showed us that Pepe has built a more expansive and complex way of working since her start in the mid-1980s.

For more than 30 years she has accumulated a family resemblance (see Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations) of works in sculpture—installation—drawing and other singular and hybrid forms. Some are drawings that are sculpture—or sculpture that is furniture, fiber works that appear as paintings, and tabletop objects that look like models for monuments, and stand as votives for a secular religion. The cultural sources and the meanings twisted together are from canonical arts of the 20th century, home crafts, lesbian, queer and feminist aesthetics, 2nd Vatican Council American design, an array of Roman Catholic sources as well as their ancient precedents.

The constant conceptual pursuit of Pepe’s research, making, teaching and writing has been to contest received knowledge, opinions and taste.

Pepe’s My Neighbor’s Garden, commissioned by the Madison Square Park Conservancy, will be on view through December 10th. Related press and other links can be found at www.sheilapepe.com.

About Lex Morgan Lancaster:

Lex Morgan Lancaster (they/them) is a scholar and curator who focuses on queer, trans, anti-racist, and crip contributions to the field of contemporary art. The author of Dragging Away: Queer Abstraction in Contemporary Art (Duke University Press, 2022), Lancaster’s scholarship focuses on queer and trans approaches to abstraction and the politics of formal and material strategies in contemporary art. Lancaster is Assistant Professor of Art History at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.

This series is developed through a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Light refreshments will be provided!

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“Young Professionals in the Arts” Night at CIMA

 

November 03, 2023, 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

General Admission: FREE

RESERVE YOUR TICKET HERE!

The Soho Arts Network presents a special FREE night of Italian art and light refreshments at CIMA.

This evening event is open to all graduate students, research fellows, young professionals* and interns in the art and art history world from the New York area.

Come join us for a guided tour of CIMA’s current exhibition Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948 and meet like-minded art lovers from all across the city.

5:30 – 6:00 pm: Refreshments, conversation and music.

6:00pm: Guided tour of CIMA’s exhibition, Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948

Light refreshments will be provided

*under the age of 35

Public programming at CIMA is made possible with the generous support of Tiro a Segno Foundation.

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Curzio Malaparte and the Visual Arts

 

October 19 - 20, 2023

Photo by Petra Liebl-Osborne

General admission: Free

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS HERE!

International Conference

Istituto Italiano di Cultura di New York; Center for Italian Modern Art; Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò – NYU

October 19-20, 2023

Italian author Curzio Malaparte (1898-1957) has been celebrated and ostracized worldwide for his controversial politics and for the impressive success of novels such as Kaputt (1944) and The Skin (1949). In his writings, Malaparte witnesses the fall of Europe during WWII by illuminating the racialized, gendered and biopolitical aspects of modern political power, even beyond fascism. At the same time, his name is indelibly associated with Casa Malaparte (1938-40, revised until 1950), the outstanding modernist mansion perched atop a solitary rock in Capri, which the author himself designed in collaboration with rationalist architect Adalberto Libera. A fabled subject and setting for countless photographers and filmmakers, Casa Malaparte has become a paradigm of luxurious minimalism and an international icon of Italian style, famously portrayed in Jean-Luc Godard’s film Contempt.

Malaparte’s unique interpretation of arts, architecture, and landscape in his visionary writing and beyond—from Casa Malaparte, to the piercing photographs he shot as a war correspondent in Ethiopia, the Balkans and Ukraine, to his anti-picturesque film The Forbidden Christ (1951)—are at the center of “Curzio Malaparte and the Visual Arts.” The conference will continue the tradition of the CIMA’s Study Days and the collaboration with the Italian Cultural Institute of New York and NYU’s Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.

Concept
FRANCO BALDASSO, Bard College, New York

Advisory Committee
STEFANO ALBERTINI, Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò – NYU
FRANCO BALDASSO, Bard College, New York
MARIA PIA DE PAULIS, Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris III
FABIO FINOTTI, Istituto Italiano di Cultura, New York
NICOLA LUCCHI, Center for Italian Modern Art, New York

 

PROGRAM

DAY 1 (October 19) ISTITUTO ITALIANO DI CULTURA – New York  (686 Park Avenue, NYC)

9:30 AM – Doors open

10:00 AM – Welcome Remarks by IIC Director Fabio Finotti
Introduction to the Conference by Franco Baldasso (Bard College)

10:30 AM – PANEL 1: Right before your Eyes: Malaparte’s Visual Poetics
Chair: Emmanuel Mattiato

Maria Pia De Paulis (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris III)
Ut pictura Historia. La rivolta dei santi maledetti o della visività tra storia, testimonianza e poesia
Diego Pellizzari (Université Grenoble Alps)
Il re è nudo. Il ritratto di Himmler in Kaputt di Curzio Malaparte
Cécile Mitéran (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris III)
Marmo e sangue: le statue ambigue di Malaparte.
Chiara Zampieri (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
Oggetti crudeli: Malaparte e la cultura materiale

1:00 PM – Lunch break

3:00 PM – PANEL 2: Encounters: Malaparte among Arts and Artists
Chair: Maria Pia De Paulis

Emmanuel Mattiato (Université Savoie Mont Blanc)
Malaparte e Prospettive: la rivista come specchio estetico di una stagione fiorente
Colin Marston (UCLA)
The Obscenity of the Unreliable Narrator: Visualization and an Aesthetic of Shock in Malaparte’s War Prose
Francesca Golia (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle/DFK Paris)
La Crocifissione di Lorenzetti. Per una lettura teologico-politica di un’ekphrasis malapartiana

5:00 PM – ROUND TABLE: Translating Malaparte into English
Moderator: Franco Baldasso (Bard College)

Stephen Twilley, translator
Jenny McPhee, translator, NYU
Edwin Frank, editor, NYRB Classics

 

DAY 2 (October 20): CENTER FOR ITALIAN MODERN ART (421 Broome Street, 4th Fl., NYC)

9:00 AM Doors open

9:30AM – Welcome Remarks by CIMA Director Nicola Lucchi

9:45 AM – PANEL 1: A House Like Me: Casa Malaparte in Capri
Chair: Davide Spagnoletto (CIMA Fellow)


Michelangelo Sabatino (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Casa Malaparte and the Landscape of Vernacular in Italy
Jean Francois Lejeune (University of Miami, Florida)
Case come me: Malaparte’s and Pasolini’s Islands
Davide Spina (ETH Zurich)
Unfit for Modernity

11:15 AM – Coffee Break

11:30 AM – PANEL 2: Casa Malaparte and the Arts: Design, Photography, and Architecture
Chair: Filippo Bosco (CIMA Fellow)

Petra Liebl-Osborne (University of Miami, Florida)
Artists at Casa Malaparte
Alessandro Melis (New York Institute of Technology)
Determinismo e non-determinismo in architettura: l’esempio di Casa Malaparte
Simone Sfriso (TAM Associati)
Casa Malaparte’s Legacy in Contemporary Architecture
Cherubino Gambardella (Università della Campania)
The Impossible Malapartes: One House, One Thousand Architectures

1:30 PM Lunch break

 

DAY 2 (October 20): CASA ITALIANA ZERILLI MARIMO’ – NYU (24 W. 12th St., NYC)

5:00 PM – Welcome Remarks by Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò’s Director Stefano Albertini
PANEL 3: The Archivio Malaparte at Biblioteca di Via Senato in Milan: Sources for the Study of Malaparte’s Cinema and Visual Culture
Chair: Franco Baldasso

Carla Maria Giacobbe (Biblioteca di Via Senato, Milan)
Malaparte and Cinema: Drafts and Projects from the Author’s Archive
Federico Oneta (Biblioteca di Via Senato, Milan)
Archivio Malaparte: A “Visual” Panorama

6:00 PM – Introduction to Curzio Malaparte, The Forbidden Christ (Il Cristo proibito, 1951):      Jeffrey Schnapp (Harvard University)

6:30 PM – Screening of The Forbidden Christ

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Organized by:

   

 

In collaboration with:

   

 

 

 

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Corrado Cagli: Opening Lecture by Curator Raffaele Bedarida

 

October 17, 2023, 6:00 PM

General admission: $15; Member & Students: FREE

RESERVE TICKETS HERE 

Join curator Raffaele Bederida who will present CIMA’s new exhibition Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948, and will analyze some of the key works exhibited in the show. 

During the 1930s, Cagli was active as a painter working on public projects commissioned by the Italian fascist regime, including the 1937 Paris Expo, for which his paintings were part of an official government-sanctioned pavilion. It was only after 1937 that Cagli faced the full force of the regime as the number of critics and fascist party intellectuals attacking his work and persona grew.
As a Jewish and openly gay artist, starting in 1937, Cagli became the target of antisemitic attacks from reactionary critics within the fascist regime. As Italy promulgated its racial laws in 1938, Cagli left the country for the United States, where he became a protagonist of the New York émigré artistic scene.

Besides addressing the themes of war, exile, and discrimination, Raffaele will illustrate how the works in the exhibition also relate to Cagli’s multifaceted engagement with the New York Surrealist and Neo-romantic milieu, as well as his collaboration with George Balanchine and the Ballet Society.

Light refreshments will be provided!

About the curator: Raffaele Bedarida, PhD. Dr. Bedarida, associate professor of Art History at Cooper Union, is an art historian and curator specializing in transnational modernism and politics. Since he joined The Cooper Union full-time faculty in 2016, he has coordinated the History and Theory of Art program. Bedarida holds a Ph.D. from the Art History Department of the CUNY Graduate Center, New York as well as M.A. and B.A. degrees in Art History from the Università degli Studi di Siena, Italy. His research has focused on cultural diplomacy, migration, and exchange between Italy and the United States. He has also worked on exhibition history, censorship, and propaganda under Fascism and during the Cold War, from Futurism to Arte Povera. Since 2008, when he founded and curated the residency program Harlem Studio Fellowship in New York, Bedarida has actively promoted programs of international exchange for emerging artists. In addition to his academic and curatorial activities, Bedarida has regularly lectured on modern and contemporary art topics at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and MoMA. Bedarida has authored three monographs: Bepi Romagnoni: Il Nuovo Racconto (Milan: Silvana, 2005); Corrado Cagli: la pittura, l’esilio, l’America (Rome: Donzelli, 2018; English edition: CPL Editions, in press); Exhibiting Italian Art in the US. Futurism to Arte Povera (London-New York: Routledge, 2022). He has also edited many volumes, among which: Methodologies of Exchange: Twentieth Century Italian Art at MoMA, 1949, with Davide Colombo and Silvia Bignami, special issue of Italian Modern Art, January 2020; Gianfranco Baruchello: Painters Ain’t Butterflies (Macerata: Quodlibet, 2021); Curating Fascism: Exhibitions and Memory from the Fall of Mussolini to Today, with Sharon Hecker (London-New York: Bloomsbury, 2022). His academic articles and essays have been published extensively in periodicals, such as Oxford Art Journal, International Yearbook of Futurism Studies, Italian Modern Art, and Artforum, and in exhibition catalogues. Bedarida’s upcoming publications is: Author, Corrado Cagli: Exile, Painting, America 1938-1947, monograph (New York: Primo Levi Center Editions, in press).

 

Public programming at CIMA is made possible with the generous support of Tiro a Segno Foundation

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Members Opening Reception: “Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938 – 1948”

 

October 12, 2023, 6:00 PM

CIMA Members at any level are invited to join us for the opening reception of our new exhibition, Transatlantic Bridges: Corrado Cagli, 1938-1948.

This will be an opportunity to view the exhibition before it opens to the public, and to meet curator Raffaele Bedarida.

Light refreshments will be provided.

NOT A MEMBER? JOIN TODAY!

Please RSVP to lombardo@italianmodernart.org

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